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ABOUT
International Cinema Education


International Cinema Education, Inc. was established in January 2003.


DESCRIPTION OF ORGANIZATION:


. Not-for-profit 501(c) (3) established in March 2005. (New York State
No. 20-97-18; Employee I.D. number:11-3735587).
. NGO at the United Nations with the Department of Public Information.
(July 2006)
. World Affairs in Foreign Films: Getting the Global Picture (McFarland, July 2011)
Textbook/Curriculum; Copyrighted, Registration number TXu-1-616-709; 2/7/08.
. Web site for Organization: http://www.internationalcinemaeducation.org
. Web site for "World Affairs in Foreign Films": www.worldaffairsinforeignfilms.com
. Contact Person: Roberta Seret, President and Founder, 917-330-0910.
roberta.seret@gmail.com


MISSION:

Overall Vision: To teach middle school students Global issues through the medium of foreign film.
(1). To use film as a catalyst to teach – to offer a wide range of material related to international events, global finance, cross cultural affairs, and multi-disciplinary subjects; and to facilitate discussions by creating a forum for questions, answers and dialogue.
(2). To encourage students to prepare themselves to compete in a global marketplace.
(3). To expose students to conflict resolution techniques that are inclusive of cultural acceptance and understanding.
(4). To supply teachers with lesson activities that include handouts, pre and post curriculum about films screened and themes discussed, and multi-disciplinary studies.
(5) To offer social, political and economic overviews about international countries by using film, literature and/or briefings.


SATISFACTION OF AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS:

The framework of the textbook satisfies the National Standards for high school social studies and corresponds to the ten social studies themes taught throughout the United States:
1. Culture
2. Time, Continuity, and Change
3. People, Places, and Environment
4. Individual Development and Identity
5. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
6. Power, Authority, and Governance
7. Production, Distribution, and Consumption
8. Science, Technology, and Society
9. Global Connections
10. Civic Ideals and Practices


SATISFACTION OF NEW YORK, CALIFORNIA, NEW JERSEY, TEXAS, FLORIDA AND ILLINOIS STATES LEARNING STANDARDS FOR SOCIAL STUDIES:

According to the above 6 states' standards in Social Studies for high school students, the textbook satisfies the 4 major standard divisions of World History; Geography; Economics; and Civics, Citizenship and Government. The following menu of topics from the above 6 states' standards can be all found in the textbook's ten chapters under the heading of HISTORY and SOCIAL SCIENCE:


WORLD HISTORY:


. Definitions of the world's great religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism,
Islam, Judaism, and Taoism;
. The age of exploration;
. The rise and fall of European colonialism;
. Global interactions and migration;
. The formation and unification of major European nations;
. Global exploration;
. Imperialism;
. Genocide;
. Human rights violations;
. Spread of Christianity and Islam throughout world history;
. Experiences of different emigrant groups;
. Encounters between Europeans and the peoples of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia;
. Nationalism and its global effects;
. Social reform movements;
. World War I and II;
. Afghanistan: land in crisis;
. Ancient and Modern China;
. Art and Life in Africa;
. Immigration;
. U.S.-Japan Studies;
. The Cold War;
. Communist Takeover;
. The formation, structure, and purpose of the United Nations;
. International arms race and nuclear proliferation;
. The Cold War and the Third World;
. The Impact of Gandhi and the non-violence movement;
. Apartheid and South Africa;
. Japan's economic and political transformation;
. The growth of terrorism as a means of warfare;
. Social, religious and cultural features of India;
. Political, economic, and military events since the 1950s impacting international
relations.


GEOGRAPHY:


. Map studies;
. Geographic issues, problems, and questions;
. Migration of human populations;
. Technological change affects people, places, and regions;
. Environmental problems;
. Demographic data;
. Different cultural groups;
. Relationship between geographic settings and development of societies;
. Social and behavioral practices in different cultures;
. Interaction of people and physical environment;
. Environmental impact of technological change on human history;
. Cultural and technological characteristics that link or divide regions.


ECONOMICS:

. Different world economic concepts and systems;
. Supply and demand; goods and services;
. The role of government in the country's economy;
. International trade;
. Role of exchange rates;
. Relationship of economic and historical movements;
. Impact of major international institutions as World Bank, International Monetary Fund,
and the World Trade Organization;
. Multinational corporations and the environment;
. Global market, economy, trade and communications;
. Credit history;
. Trade between nations;
. International business and global issues;
. Growth of world economy with the information, technological, and communications
revolution.


CIVICS, CITIZENSHIP, and GOVERNMENT:

. Evolution of constitutional democracies throughout the world;
. Comparison of political systems;
. Conflict mediation and resolution;
. Democratic principles;
. Civic education;
. Community justice;
. Judges in the classroom;
. United Nations;
. Understanding global problems.


SATISFACTION OF NEW YORK, CALIFORNIA, NEW JERSEY, TEXAS, FLORIDA AND ILLINOIS STATES LEARNING STANDARDS FOR LANGUAGE ARTS:

According to the above 6 states' standards in Language Arts for high school students, the textbook satisfies the 4 major standard divisions of: Literary understandings; Forms of writing; Language skills and conventions; and Media studies.

I have categorized these in the text as: World literature; Media studies; Creative writing/Composition; Music; and Art.

The following menu of topics from the above 6 states' standards can all be found in the textbook's ten chapters under the heading of LITERATURE and VISUAL ARTS:

. Media literacy;
. Visual media;
. Research and technical writing;
. Public speaking;
. Speech communication;
. Debate;
. Journalism;
. Photo journalism;
. Literary response and analysis;
. Literary text analysis: irony, tone, imagery, symbolism, characterization; character foil;
. World literature;
. Processing, analyzing, and responding to the visual arts;
. Creating, performing, and participating in the visual arts;
. Film and cinematography techniques;
. Different genres of media compared;
. Critical analysis and evaluation;
. Composition: comparative essay, narrative essay, essay;
. Biography and autobiography;
. Social communication of writing;
. Historical fiction;
. Historical non-fiction;
. Global themes- reading, writing and understanding;
. Newspapers and news magazines;
. Electronic-based communication;
. Documents;
. Media presentations;
. Personal voice: journal, diary;
. Non-fiction literature;
. Oral presentations: spoken voice, personal voice, vernacular language;
. Allegory;
. Drama; tragedy;
. Folktales;
. Fables;
. Myths, legends and epics;
. Poetry: narrative, lyric, free verse;
. Letter writing.

 

PLEASE VISIT:

Vialogues from Columbia University

Master Class Demonstration, Columbia University, Teachers College, (Video/Article)

Ed Lab, Columbia University, Teachers College

International Cinema Education

The Gift of Diamonds


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